This Week in CFD

Applications

SC/Tetra was used to compute the aerodynamic performance of vehicles in the video game Grand Turismo 6. See the link below.

SC/Tetra was used to compute the aerodynamic performance of vehicles in the video game Gran Turismo 6. See the link below.

  • Cradle North America’s SC/Tetra was used to compute the aerodynamic performance of the vehicles in the video game Gran Turismo 6.
  • From the Journal of Aerosol Science comes CFD Simulation of Total and Regional Fiber Deposition in Human Nasal Cavities. [Trust me, had there been a decent image from this study I would’ve included it.]
  • Intelligent Light shares a white paper on Red Bull Racing‘s use of CFD.
  • Keep up with your Formula 1 regulation changes with this video.
  • Must watch video from 1988 showcasing CFD capabilities at NASA Ames Research Center.

Software

  • Read all about PyFR, an open source framework for solving advection-diffusion problems.
  • Desktop Engineering reports that Altair’s partner alliance program grew by 45% and now includes 40 participants.
  • UFO-CFD v5 is now available.
  • Beta CAE released ANSA v14.2.3.
  • If you use the DPLR CFD code and Tecplot you might be interested in this macro developed specifically for the two.

Hardware

  • NVIDIA announced the worldwide availability of their GRID Virtual GPU technology. [This announcement is so full of jargon I really don’t understand what they’re talking about. But I’m certain it’s good.]
  • IBM announced a new world record in compute performance for a CFD simulation. As shown in the figure below, simulating the cavitation collapse of 15,000 bubbles used 6.4 million threads on an IBM BlueGene computer achieve a throughput of 14.4 Petaflops.
A world record 14.4 Pflops performance was achieved for a CFD simulation of cavitation collapse. See link above.

A world record 14.4 Pflops performance was achieved for a CFD simulation of cavitation collapse. See link above.

Events

Tears Are the Silent Language of Meshing*

Unlike baseball, there’s plenty of crying in mesh generation: tears of frustration, anger, sadness. Artist and photographer Rose-Lynn Fisher wondered whether her sad tears were different from her happy tears. Armed with a camera and a microscope, she set out to answer that question. It seems they’re very different as you can see in Topography of Tears.

Rose-Lynn Fisher, Tears of Grief, 2013

Rose-Lynn Fisher, Tears of Grief, 2013

*With apologies to Voltaire.

This is the last issue of This Week in CFD for 2013.
Happy New Year!

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2 Responses to This Week in CFD

  1. Martin Hegedus says:

    John, thanks for pointing out the Ames video. Just a short while ago I was looking for Karen Gundy’s work with compressors when there was that discussion with Dr. Wu. It’s at 34:26. Gridding has come a long way since then! I remember dealing with 3D Grape when working on some of the grids for the F18. Anyway, good memories!

  2. John Chawner says:

    Thanks, Martin. It brought back a lot of good memories for me too. Reese Sorenson and John and I had a lot of conversations about grids back then.

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