This Week in CFD

Software Releases

Jobs

Pointwise and GridPro Collaborate

The recent release of Pointwise Version 17.1 R4 includes file-level compatibility with the GridPro structured grid generator. Pointwise can export structured and unstructured surface meshes to GridPro’s fixed surfaces file format for use as geometry in GridPro. Pointwise can also import GridPro’s volume grid files so you can modify or add other grid to them (to make a hybrid mesh, for example).

Starting with a CATIA model (gray) in Pointwise, an unstructured surface mesh was generated and exported to GridPro for use as geometry. GridPro created a structured, multi-block hex grid near the blades, which was exported back to Pointwise for addition of the outer unstructured mesh.

Starting with a CATIA model (gray) in Pointwise, an unstructured surface mesh was generated and exported to GridPro for use as geometry. GridPro created a structured, multi-block hex grid near the blades, which was exported back to Pointwise for addition of the outer unstructured mesh.

You might think that two competitors collaborating is odd. But it makes good sense for users of both tools. A GridPro user can take advantage of Pointwise’s native CAD import and surface meshing to prepare geometry. And a Pointwise user can add unstructured and hybrid mesh to a multi-block structured grid from GridPro. And even though both programs have structured grid generation capabilities the two approaches are quite complementary.

Also included in Pointwise V17.1 R4 is a native interface to the DLR TAU CFD solver and an updated OpenFOAM interface that now supports cell sets and zones.

Wheeling and Dealing

Applications

Tank sloshing simulation performed using Autodesk Simulation CFD 2014.

Tank sloshing simulation performed using Autodesk Simulation CFD 2014.

Read & Discuss

  • The folks at Convergent Science are all about automating mesh generation as noted in their recent blog post, Automatic (Meshing) for the People. They quote Habashi (we “cannot let the user decide where to generate and concentrate points.”) and cite the “school of thought that believes that making a mesh by hand is essential to achieving an accurate solution.” [In my experience that’s half true. No one wants or needs to hand craft a mesh. (Although it sure can be fun.) But to most people, automatic mesh generation means “make a mesh automatically and exactly the way I would have done it myself.”]
  • Katate Masatsuka likes CFD. You can download his 299 page book I Do Like CFD (sponsored by Software Cradle) or buy a printed and bound version for a nominal fee.
  • To add to your reading, NAFEM’s has revamped their Benchmark Magazine and now provides it online for free. (Registration required.) This month’s article on Icons of CFD features Antony Jameson.
  • Design News writes about Altair’s automotive-oriented Virtual Wind Tunnel.
  • Videos and documents from last month’s SU2 and OpenMDAO workshop are available online.

Awards and Honors

  • Reaction Design is up for a Most Innovative New Product award (San Diego’s tech industry’s version of the Academy Award®) for their FORTE CFD – Soot Prediction. [I challenge you to find “Academy Award” and “soot” in the same sentence anywhere else.]
  • Two of the five winners of Computer Weekly’s European User Awards for Data Centre involve CFD.

Lattice Gases and Conformal Maps

This article sprays more mathematical terminology than former NFL headcoach Bill Cowher sprays spittle during a sideline tirade. So I will rely on smarter folk to fully enjoy Lattice Gases and Conformal Maps from the Complex Projective 4-Space blog. [My one takeaway was the great analogy of the Schwarz-Christoffel mapping as fitting a square peg into a round hole. Be sure to click on some of the linked-to articles for animations and other cool stuff.]

Mandelbulb Fractal. I have no idea. Image from Complex Projective 4-Space.

Mandelbulb Fractal. I have no idea. Image from Complex Projective 4-Space.

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