This Week in CFD

Meshing

  • CD-adapco’s Dr. Mesh gives advice on modeling rotating wheels. [Dr. Mesh makes me laugh because back in the day someone told us that people who do meshing are the nurses of CFD, not the doctors.]
  • COMSOL shares tips on when to mesh using hexes, tets, prisms, and pyramids. [Note: these tips seem to apply to simulations run using COMSOL as opposed to being general tips.]
  • The Triangle Mesh Completer is a Rhino plug-in that fills in gaps in point cloud data.
  • LearnCAx delves into the many issues of mesh quality. I don’t mean to nitpick but…
    • “…hexahedral mesh will always [emphasis added] give more accurate results because the mesh elements are always [emphasis added] aligned with the flow direction…” No, they aren’t always. Hex cells will be aligned with the flow near the body if the hex cells are body-aligned because the flow follows the body. Away from the body, there’s no guarantee of mesh-flow alignment.
    • In the description of their computation of skewness they state that “1 corresponds to a perfect cube.” I don’t think so. 1 would correspond to any rectangular parallelepiped including a very high aspect ratio brick.

Applications & Events

Tecplot visualization of inspiratory flow in human airways. Image from Tecplot.

Tecplot visualization of inspiratory flow in human airways. Image from Tecplot.

  • Read about how Tecplot was used to visualize MRI data and other simulation of films and mixing.
  • The presentations from Solid Edge University 2013 are available online for download. There’s one about FEA and their mesher, Femap. It also appears that their 2014 event is scheduled for 12-16 May with the last two days being a dedicated Femap Symposium.
  • FloTHERM celebrated its 25th anniversary. [And there was cake!]
  • Everyone’s used the Preview button in Word’s Print command. Now from Autodesk comes Project Miller, a preview for 3D printing.
  • The cloud makes CAD slower and other reasons why CAD isn’t moving to the cloud any time soon.
  • The current issue of the International Journal of CFD includes a paper on a GPU-based, moving, overset solver for the incompressible N-S equations.

Software

Simulation of fume abatement using both Fluent and EDEM in parallel. Image from DEM Solutions.

Simulation of fume abatement using both Fluent and EDEM in parallel. Image from DEM Solutions.

FieldView 14 post-processed these 16 datasets from the AIAA High Lift Prediction Workshop using 8 cores per dataset without requiring additional license fees. Image from Intelligent Light.

FieldView 14 post-processed these 16 datasets from the AIAA High Lift Prediction Workshop using 8 cores per dataset without requiring additional license fees. Image from Intelligent Light.

Flying Snakes

Apparently snakes have used CFD to learn how to fly. Sometimes science should just say no. Watch the video and be very, very afraid. When we teach spiders to fly I am so out of here.

Schematic illustration of a snake's flying mechanisms. Image from the NVIDIA blog.

Schematic illustration of a snake’s flying mechanisms. Image from the NVIDIA blog.

After those snakes I need a visual palate cleanser. Here’s the lastest photography by Fabian Oefner called Orchid – paint splashes that look like flower blossoms. [Yes, I know I said I wouldn’t post more photos of splashing stuff. But after the snakes?]

Orchid by Fabian Oefner. Image from Laughing Squid.

Orchid by Fabian Oefner. Image from Laughing Squid.

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