This Week in CFD

Software

  • CEI announced that CPFD Software will bundle their EnSight software with CPFD’s Barracuda for visualization of computational particle fluid dynamics solutions of fluidized reactors. In a related blog post, CEI shares examples of Barracuda solutions visualized in EnSight. Also see image below.
  • DEVELOP3D writes about how SpaceClaim‘s broadening user community has resulted in many new capabilities that make it a “slick tool.”
  • WindSim AS launched a cloud-based version of their CFD toolset for wind turbine analysis.
Screen capture from a EnSight video of a Barracuda CFD solution of a gasifier showing volume fraction of particles. Image from CEI.

Screen capture from a EnSight video of a Barracuda CFD solution of a gasifier showing volume fraction of particles. Image from CEI.

Applications

  • NASA’s work on reducing aircraft noise is described in this article from International Science Grid This Week. Simulations performed using Exa’s PowerFLOW have shown how a new device can decrease flap-generated noise. (Noise is the number one complaint reported to the FAA.)
  • CFD solutions computed using STAR-CCM+ for the latest bicycle racing helmet from Louis Garneau compared to within 4% of wind tunnel test results. See image below.
Screen capture from a video comparing the acoustic field for an aircraft with (right) and without (left) noise reducing devices. Image from ISGTW.

Screen capture from a video comparing the acoustic field for an aircraft with (right) and without (left) noise reducing devices. Image from ISGTW.

Reading & Jobs

CFD solution from STAR-CCM+ for a Louis Garneau cycling helmet. Image from HPC Magazine.

CFD solution from STAR-CCM+ for a Louis Garneau cycling helmet. Image from HPC Magazine.

Events

Alert reader Walker B. pointed me at this video of the dynamic patterns on the surface of heated soap bubbles. Click image (from New Scientist) for the video. Email FYFD for an explanation of the science.

Alert reader Walker B. pointed me at this video of the dynamic patterns on the surface of heated soap bubbles. Click image (from New Scientist) for the video. Email FYFD for an explanation of the science.

Grid Generation the Hard Way

Back in the day, grid generation could mean a Fortran DATA statement. [Look it up, kids.] Sometimes it felt like you were drawing the grid by hand.

Which is exactly what artist Susie MacMurray does in her series of pen on paper gauze bandage drawings. You’ll have to take my word for it that the image below pales in comparison to the real thing which is quite intricate and detailed. I had the pleasure of seeing one of these drawings during a recent visit to the Arkansas Arts Center in Little Rock. [She would probably not take kindly to a suggestion to apply a little smoothing with an elliptic PDE based method.]

Susie MacMurray, Gauze Bandage 2009. Image from Ms. MacMurray's website.

Susie MacMurray, Gauze Bandage 2009. Image from Ms. MacMurray’s website.

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One Response to This Week in CFD

  1. John Rhoads says:

    In regard to the soap bubble: What you’re seeing is the result of an effectively two dimensional system. Turbulence in two dimensions has a tendency for small structures to coalesce, resulting in long-lived, coherent vortical structures (like hurricanes/cyclones). This is sometimes called an inverse cascade since energy is transferred to larger structures, as opposed to three dimensional (everyday) turbulence where injected energy is carried down into smaller and smaller features until it is damped at the viscous (Kolmogorov) length scale. In this case, thin-film interference provides a colorful visualization of the flow patterns driven by convective forces in the bubble. Despite our perspective that the atmosphere is quite three dimensional, it is actually quite thin when compared with the diameter of the earth, and so the caption is correct in its assertion that the vortices in the soap film are small relatives of atmospheric events–the primary distinction being the role of Coriolis forces in driving the flow of hurricanes.

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