This Week in CFD

Software and Events

Jobs

Applications and Software

Screen capture from a video illustrating a 13 billion year simulation of the entire universe. (Click image for video. See link below.)

Screen capture from a video illustrating a 13 billion year simulation of the entire universe. (Click image for video. See link below.)

  • Harvard researchers used a program called Illustris to simulate 13 billion years of the evolution of the universe using 12 billion cells on a domain sized 350 million light years per side. See video above. [Assuming equally spaced hex cells leads to a cell edge length of 1.44 * 1022 meters. To put that in perspective, each cell is twice the size of Kanye West’s ego.]
  • The need for advanced computational methods in the marine propulsion arena is noted here. [Includes a CFD image and mesh from Pointwise.]
  • Kitware has been sharing new ParaView features on their blog including color bar placement and specular highlights.
  • Autodesk MeshMixer 2.4 was released. You can download it here and watch videos about it here.

Software and Applications

From WaterWorld (no relation to Kevin Cosner) comes this CFD simulation of waste water treatment basins. (Click image for article.)

From WaterWorld (no relation to Kevin Costner) comes this CFD simulation of waste water treatment basins. (Click image for article.)

  • With wildfire season upon us in the U.S. it’s topical to see that NIST’s Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS) has been extended to include vegetation as a fuel. The result is the Wildland-Urban FDS.
  • When The Cloud gets into the Wall Street Journal, is it good or bad? Regardless, they make a case for The Fog.
  • GrabCAD wants everyone to know that they’re not building a CAD system.
  • Thinking about outsourcing your CFD analysis? Desktop Engineering lists the 7 keys to making this work well. #4 Communication and progress tracking are critical. [Want to outsource your meshing?]
Gotta love Symscape's polymesh for the Tower Bridge geometry - the IMR's meshing contest geometry for this year. (Click image for article.)

Gotta love Symscape’s polymesh for the Tower Bridge geometry – the IMR’s meshing contest geometry for this year. (Click image for article.)

I Have No Idea How These Two Things Are Related

From the “I have no idea what these two things are related” department comes this photo of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and meshes at a recent F8 Developer conference. Not only are meshes a big part of the event’s overall branding, but if you watch the video of his keynote you’ll see that the meshes actually move and animate slowly during his talk.

Zuckerberg loves meshes.

Zuckerberg loves meshes.

 

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3 Responses to This Week in CFD

  1. Martin says:

    OMG, I hit the floor laughing when I read about “Fog Computing”.

    “Until the U.S. gets the fast wireless and wired Internet it deserves, computing things as close to the user as possible is going to be critical to making the Internet of Things responsive enough to be usable.”

    Umm, bandwidth has always been an issue, even way back when cloud computing was called time-sharing. So, I guess we’re back to workstations, intranets, and VPNs?

    The Internet of Things will never be responsive enough, and has never been, because our in house infrastructure and needs grow in step with technology.

  2. John Chawner says:

    Well, I typed a good reply and got a “could not be posted” error. Phooey. So here’s a “not as good” reply. In general, computing should be done as close to the source as possible. If sufficient power is not available locally, you go to the cloud. In order to do that, you need bandwidth to make it worth the effort. The U.S. lags behind lots of countries in terms of bandwidth infrastructure (e.g. Japan). But regardless of how big that pipe is, chatter from the IoT is simply going to narrow the pipe. Works expands to consume all available resources, whether that’s CFD or the cloud. The real question is why does my coffee maker need to be on the ‘net?

    • Martin says:

      Well the need for the coffee maker to be on the net may be related to the possible need for coffee to get out of the mental fog. Maybe computers are the same way? How can my bits get out of the Fog if the coffee maker is not attached to the router?

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