This Week in CFD

Big Things in CFD

  • Mentor Graphics has appended five new ones to their list of CFD Myths. I won’t spoil the surprise for you but will cite Myth #8: Experts Are Needed To Get Accurate CFD Simulation Results. [I recommend that you download, read, and start a discussion.]
  • CIMdata published their simulation and analysis market report in which they illustrate that the S&A market grew by 7.1% from 2012 to 2013 ($4 billion to $4.3 billion) and project compound annual growth of 7.7% leading to a market size of $6.2 billion in 2018. The report can be purchased here for $3,000.
  • Remember the CFD 2030 Vision Study and its estimate of an exascale computer’s power requirements? In a letter to the editor of Aviation Week magazine, a reader proposes powering this machine with a dedicated, modular, nuclear reactor. [Booyah!](Registration required.)
Using geometry from CT scans, this modeling of blood flow with CFD is one example of computational medicine. See associated text for link. Image from International Science Grid This Week.

Using geometry from CT scans, this modeling of blood flow with CFD is one example of computational medicine. See associated text for link. Image from International Science Grid This Week.

Software

Spider Man vs. Venom. Because mesh. Click for source.

Spider Man vs. Venom. Because mesh. Click for source.

Turbulence

  • To understand turbulence we need the intuitive perspective of art. [Factoid: Werner Heisenberg’s – Nobel prize winner for quantum mechanics – doctoral thesis was on turbulence.]
  • On a related topic, FYFD‘s Nicole Sharp authored The Beautiful Unpredictability of Coffee, Clouds, and Fire.
"CFD is perhaps the most colourful technique used in engineering," is one quote from this article about CFD for a triathalon bicycle. 72% of the drag comes from what? Think before clicking the image for the article. Image from New Scientist.

“CFD is perhaps the most colourful technique used in engineering,” is one quote from this article about CFD for a triathalon bicycle. 72% of the drag comes from what? Think before clicking the image for the article. Image from New Scientist.

Applications

The effect of cooling fins (below) on the temperature of a hammer housing. Image from Mentor Graphics.

The effect of cooling fins (below) on the temperature of a hammer housing. Image from Mentor Graphics.

Space versus Place – The Grid in Painting (Again)

Another artist expanding upon use of the grid in abstract painting is Bill Mazziotti. By combining the grid with his organic elements of scraping the canvas and overpainting he creates a stabilized tension.

Grid-based paintings by Bill Mazziotti. Image from Donald S. Kolberg Sculpture and Painting.

Grid-based paintings by Bill Mazziotti. Image from Donald S. Kolberg Sculpture and Painting.

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4 Responses to This Week in CFD

  1. Martin says:

    I didn’t download Mentor’s marketing white paper, but in regards to “Myth #8: Experts Are Needed To Get Accurate CFD Simulation Results” (I’m guessing what’s its about) one needs to distinguish between accuracy in regards to how accurately the results represent the mathematical model and how accurately the results represent real world values. Most should be able to throw grid points at a problem (assuming one has the resources) and achieve accurate representation of the mathematical model. So, is Mentor Graphics saying it is a Myth that Wind Tunnels are still required?

  2. John Chawner says:

    Hi Martin:

    I interpret Myth #8 as saying that you don’t need to be a PhD CFD solver developer with 20 years of experience to get accurate CFD results. I agree in the sense that all you need is a competent user. And no, I inferred nothing about wind tunnels.

  3. Martin says:

    BTW, here is a little “exchange” of posts between Boris Marovic (Industry Manager at Mentor Graphics) and I. https://www.linkedin.com/groupAnswers?viewQuestionAndAnswers=&discussionID=111866885&gid=66032&commentID=5877319448540512256&trk=view_disc&fromEmail=&ut=2N5qD-7aiHF6k1 This is the “Computational Fluid Dynamics Group” at LinkedIn. When all was said and done, I gather he did not understand what’s implied when one uses a “pure” immersed boundary condition.

  4. Martin says:

    This might me a better link to the discussion:

    https://www.linkedin.com/groups/Hi-can-anybody-explain-me-66032.S.111866885?trk=groups_search_item_list-0-b-ttl&goback=.gna_66032

    The nice part about being and “expert” in CFD is that one can traverse through all the smoke and mirrors. I also felt that Boris’s attitude was poor. Granted, some would say that I sometimes don’t bring out the best in people!

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