This Week in CFD

Software

People and News

Applications

Simulation of oxidative coupling of methane. Solution from STAR-CCM+.  Image from CD-adapco. Click image for article. [Note: I am a big fan of whitespace in design but I cropped this image to remove and excess of it and in the process removed CD-adapco's watermark. I'll put it back in if they ask.]

Simulation of oxidative coupling of methane. Solution from STAR-CCM+. Image from CD-adapco. Click image for article. [Note: I love this image. It’s very cool. Plus, I am a big fan of whitespace in design. But I cropped this image to remove what was IMO excessive whitespace and in the process removed CD-adapco’s watermark. I’ll put it back in if they ask.]

  • Intelligent Light participated in the DoE’s recent Atmosphere to Electrons workshop and shared their thoughts on CFD post-processing requirements for wind turbine simulations that range from airfoil to full site.
  • A proposal in Formula 1 to ban the use of wind tunnels and instead rely more on CFD is meeting opposition. For example, “CFD is a splendid thing, but it is simply not a tool which works in isolation of wind tunnels.” [I tend to agree.]

Rejected by FYFD

I like to tease FYFD‘s Nicole Sharp because it’s hard to find something about fluid dynamics she either hasn’t already covered or isn’t lame. Here are my two latest rejections.

Making the Bad Look Good

There are few things worse in a grid than intersecting triangles. You could have a surface mesh that folds back on itself. (Or is it the CAD surface?). You could have two surface meshes (or faceted geometry surfaces) that intersect for any of a number of reasons. (Ever do an underhood geometry and have a component of the engine pierce the hood?) Advancing fronts or layers may collide. A tet mesh might not be able to properly recover its boundary. The list goes on and on.

But artist Peter Schmidt makes a bad grid look good in his painting from 1971 titled Intersecting Triangles.

Peter Schmidt, Intersecting Triangles, 1971. Image from The Peter Schmidt Blog. Click image for link.

Peter Schmidt, Intersecting Triangles, 1971. Image from The Peter Schmidt Blog. Click image for link.

Peter collaborated frequently with musician Brian Eno on the latter’s album covers and and the duo’s Oblique Strategies card deck, a series of quotes for overcoming obstacles (for example, “Honor thy error as a hidden intention.”).

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2 Responses to This Week in CFD

  1. akumaransys says:

    Please add upcoming ANSYS Convergence Conferences to your list:

    http://www.ansys.com/Conference [Santa Clara April 21, Chicago May 8, Houston June 9]

    and

    http://www.ansys.com/aswc [Detroit June 2-3]

    Thanks, Ashwini

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