This Week in CFD

News

  • It seems that President Obama is also a fan of the CFD Vision 2030 Study as it is cited in the Whitehouse’s recent announcement of the executive order creating the National Strategic Computing Initiative, a research program intended to push U.S. HPC into the exaflops and exabytes realm.
  • A new CAE (i.e. FEA and CFD) market forecast predicts growth of 11.34% during the period 2014-2019. [Sadly, I’m way too jaded to take most of these forecasts seriously.]
  • GrabCAD does a good job of describing up and coming discrete geometry (aka 3D printing) file formats: AMF vs. 3DF.
Sample computation from Beta CAE's new Epilysis FEA solver. Image from ENGINEERING.com. See link below.

Sample computation from Beta CAE’s new Epilysis FEA solver. Image from ENGINEERING.com. See link below.

Software

  • MSC Apex Diamond Python [wow] was released and includes advances in mid-surface modeling.
  • Beta CAE System included a new FEA solver, Eπilysis [ωοω], in release 16 of their software suite.
  • OpenVSP 3.2.0, the open source parametric aircraft geometry tool, was released.
  • Feature detection (mesh to surfaces and features) is coming in the next release of Polygonica as we see from this article in DEVELOP3D.
  • Updated versions of MicroCFD are now available.
  • Kitware shares information about Computational Model Builder, their framework for end-to-end simulation support including preprocessing.
Part of a nuclear reactor mesh generated using components of Kitware's CMB. Image from Kitware. See link above.

Part of a nuclear reactor mesh generated using components of Kitware’s CMB. Image from Kitware. See link above.

Events

Meshing

Guitar body geometry displayed in Pointwise for the 23rd International Meshing Roundtable meshing contest.

Guitar body geometry displayed in Pointwise for the 23rd International Meshing Roundtable meshing contest.

What If Your Mesh Came to Life?

When it comes to abstract painting, not every horizontal line is a horizon and not every vertical line is a person. But it seems to me that every triangle, square, tet, or hex is a mesh. Because that’s the first thing I thought of when I saw 1024 architecture‘s video The Walking Cube.

Screen capture of 1024 architecture's video The Walking Cube. Click image for video.

Screen capture of 1024 architecture’s video The Walking Cube. Click image for video.

In fact, I find the video oddly nightmarish – a Frankensteinian hex mesh cell come to life, awkward yet menacing. Is this what happens to cells inside mesh generation software when they’re being generated and stretched and skewed and sized to our specifications? It looks tortuous. Maybe this hex has escaped the mesh to seek vengeance for how it has suffered.

Or maybe I just need a good night’s sleep.

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