This Week in CFD

News

  • Is the sky really falling? A DoE and NSA report fears the U.S. may lose its lead in HPC within a decade. On the other hand, the article’s author thinks chasing an arbitrary milestone like exascale isn’t as optimal as continuous, organic improvement.
  • Also on the HPC topic, Fujitsu’s HPC Gateway promises to simplify access to HPC resources.
  • Onshape says you’re paying too much for your CAD software if you rarely use technical support. They cite 3 other reasons too.
  • Thunderbird Power is using STAR-CCM+ to design a wind turbine.
  • The CAD Society announced it’s annual award winners:
  • Here’s best of the visualization web for February 2017.
  • If you’re displaying math on the web using MathJax, you need to know that it’s shutting down at the end of this month.

Software

  • Bulk materials simulation just got a bit more accessible with EDEM’s launch of a series of products EDEM for ANSYS, MSC, and Siemens.
  • Phi is new 3-D modeling software from start-up Phenometry (founded by former Spatial folks) which features n-sided surfaces and a web-based user interface that promised to “democratize 3-D design.”
  • Particle In Cell released Starfish v0.16.1, their 2-D solver for plasma and gas kinetics.
  • The latest version of Moldex3D (R15.0) includes automatic hex meshing for runners and much more.

Events

4-D Printed Space Mesh Fabric

This so-called “space fabric” is a prototype from NASA’s JPL where they’re 3-D printing (or actually 4-D printing because it’s 3-D geometry plus function) woven metal for use in space as shielding, space suits, or solar arrays. Thanks to alert reader Carolyn for sharing this with me.

space_fabric_2

NASA’s Space Fabric looks like a structured grid to me. Image from NASA. See link above.

Another example of a metal, mesh-like fabric (of sorts) was interesting, but cannot be shown here without giving this blog post an R rating.

And how about a bonus?

qbert-hex-mesh

Bonus: This so-called Q*bert Hex Mesh was shared by reader Jeff whom I’m hoping will point me at its original source including location and artist.

Bonus Science: Please take a moment to ponder how you’d simulate this in your CFD solver: a fluid with negative mass. Scientists have created a fluid that seemingly violates Newton’s second law because the acceleration opposes the direction of the applied force. The behavior of this fluid, a Bose-Einstein condensate, plays a little trick with inertial mass.

This entry was posted in Applications, Events, Hardware, News, Software and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to This Week in CFD

  1. Pingback: Losing Our Edge in High Performance Computing? | Positive Infinity

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s