This Week in CFD

News

  • It seems that President Obama is also a fan of the CFD Vision 2030 Study as it is cited in the Whitehouse’s recent announcement of the executive order creating the National Strategic Computing Initiative, a research program intended to push U.S. HPC into the exaflops and exabytes realm.
  • A new CAE (i.e. FEA and CFD) market forecast predicts growth of 11.34% during the period 2014-2019. [Sadly, I’m way too jaded to take most of these forecasts seriously.]
  • GrabCAD does a good job of describing up and coming discrete geometry (aka 3D printing) file formats: AMF vs. 3DF.
Sample computation from Beta CAE's new Epilysis FEA solver. Image from ENGINEERING.com. See link below.

Sample computation from Beta CAE’s new Epilysis FEA solver. Image from ENGINEERING.com. See link below.

Software

  • MSC Apex Diamond Python [wow] was released and includes advances in mid-surface modeling.
  • Beta CAE System included a new FEA solver, Eπilysis [ωοω], in release 16 of their software suite.
  • OpenVSP 3.2.0, the open source parametric aircraft geometry tool, was released.
  • Feature detection (mesh to surfaces and features) is coming in the next release of Polygonica as we see from this article in DEVELOP3D.
  • Updated versions of MicroCFD are now available.
  • Kitware shares information about Computational Model Builder, their framework for end-to-end simulation support including preprocessing.
Part of a nuclear reactor mesh generated using components of Kitware's CMB. Image from Kitware. See link above.

Part of a nuclear reactor mesh generated using components of Kitware’s CMB. Image from Kitware. See link above.

Events

Meshing

Guitar body geometry displayed in Pointwise for the 23rd International Meshing Roundtable meshing contest.

Guitar body geometry displayed in Pointwise for the 23rd International Meshing Roundtable meshing contest.

What If Your Mesh Came to Life?

When it comes to abstract painting, not every horizontal line is a horizon and not every vertical line is a person. But it seems to me that every triangle, square, tet, or hex is a mesh. Because that’s the first thing I thought of when I saw 1024 architecture‘s video The Walking Cube.

Screen capture of 1024 architecture's video The Walking Cube. Click image for video.

Screen capture of 1024 architecture’s video The Walking Cube. Click image for video.

In fact, I find the video oddly nightmarish – a Frankensteinian hex mesh cell come to life, awkward yet menacing. Is this what happens to cells inside mesh generation software when they’re being generated and stretched and skewed and sized to our specifications? It looks tortuous. Maybe this hex has escaped the mesh to seek vengeance for how it has suffered.

Or maybe I just need a good night’s sleep.

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This Week in CFD

News

  • Readers of FYFD [the best blog with a name I can’t say to my mother] are invited to participate in a reader survey.
  • The National Science Foundation is sponsoring the Beauty of Computing campaign and asks that you post “computer generated images that bring science to life” using the #beautyofcomputing hashtag.
  • MAYA has several job openings in CFD and CAE.
DEVELOP3D reviewed ANSYS AIM 16.1 for multiphysics simulation. Image from DEVELOP3D. Click image for article.

DEVELOP3D reviewed ANSYS AIM 16.1 for multiphysics simulation. Image from DEVELOP3D. Click image for article.

Applications

ENGINEERING.com has a nice article on the CFD of racing bikes including the effect that a trailing automobile can have on a cyclist's finish. Image from ENGINEERING.com. Click image for article.

ENGINEERING.com has a nice article on the CFD of racing bikes including the effect that a trailing automobile can have on a cyclist’s finish. Image from ENGINEERING.com. Click image for article.

  • Jaguar Land Rover is using STAR-CCM+ as part of a coupled multi-physics simulation of vehicle wading (i.e. driving your car through water of various depths). [Ask me about the time I was driven through water deep enough to flow over the hood of a rental car.]
  • CFD contributed to the design of a next generation LNG carrier ship (8% more energy efficient, 5% more cargo) via the LNGreen Joint Industry Project.
The folks at CFD Support have been working on transient simulation of a sports car with rotating wheels in OpenFOAM. Click image for web page and video.

The folks at CFD Support have been working on transient simulation of a sports car with rotating wheels in OpenFOAM. Click image for web page and video.

Software

Events & Reading

An interesting slide from Airbus' presentation on HPC needs of simulation in which we see that "one night batch capability" for CFD based noise simulation is coming in early 2020. Image from ThePlatform.net. See link above.

An interesting slide from Airbus’ presentation on HPC needs of simulation in which we see that “one night batch capability” for CFD based noise simulation is coming in early 2020. Image from ThePlatform.net. See link above.

Music, Physics, Physics, Music

For the third time, the Montreux Jazz Festival featured a workshop on The Physics of Music and the Music of Physics. The former revolved around work done on sonic spatialization (i.e. multidimensionality of sound) while the latter centered on a piano improvisation by Al Blatter with accompaniment by sounds synthesized from collisions in the Large Hadron Collider.

Jazz pianist Al Blatter performing a live improv to sounds from the LHC. Image from Int'l Science Grid This Week. See links above.

Jazz pianist Al Blatter performing a live improv to sounds from the LHC. Image from Int’l Science Grid This Week. See links above.

(Originally seen on International Science Grid This Week.)

Bonus: For those of you addicted to meshes and geometry in art I share Jiyong Lee’s stunning glass sculptures from his Segmentation series. While the artist’s inspiration for these works is the biological process of cell division, I can’t help but see 3D domain decompositions. I checked into pricing for these works and the numbers are well into the 5 figure range. I’m not even a huge fan of sculpture in general but these works make me want to hold them.

Jiyong Lee, White Axial Cuboid Biaxial Segmentation, 2014. Image from the artist's website. See link above.

Jiyong Lee, White Axial Cuboid Biaxial Segmentation, 2014. Image from the artist’s website. See link above.

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Pointwise at MeshTrends 10

Nick Wyman, Pointwise’s director of applied research, will be presenting the results of some recent work on sizing functions for tetrahedral meshes at next week’s Symposium on Trends in Unstructured Mesh Generation (aka MeshTrends).

Nick’s presentation, Element-Size Gradation in an Unstructured Tetrahedral Mesh Using Radial Basis Functions, was co-authored with his Pointwise colleagues Mike Jefferies, Steve Karman, and John Steinbrenner, and is scheduled for Monday 27 July at 11:20 a.m. in room Promenade B.

Example of a tet mesh with an imposed element sizing field.

Example of a tet mesh with an imposed element sizing field.

The presentation’s abstract:

Generation of a constrained tetrahedral mesh with a prescribed element size gradation requires knowledge of the desired element size at discrete locations in the domain. User control of element size gradation is provided through the constraining surface mesh, optional primitive (curve and surface) shape sources, influence parameters, and a background mesh size. These user controls, while convenient and natural, are in a form difficult to translate to an arbitrary point in the domain. Furthermore, if the input is inconsistent, which is common in the authors’ experience, discontinuities in the desired element size field can be created leading to poor mesh quality. We propose a method for general interpolation of a user prescribed element size field which also minimizes the effect of inconsistent input. A method for defining and interpolating a target 3D element size field utilizing radial basis functions (RBF) will be described. The process begins with the conversion of the constraining surface mesh and optional primitive shape sources into an equivalent element size field represented by radial basis functions. In our method, each RBF provides local target element size using a linear distance function. Selection of a linear distance function for element size allows for natural definition of the input influence parameter also known as the element growth rate. Furthermore, an individual RBF is only effective within a distance defined by the background mesh size and the influence parameter. Each constraining surface point contributes an RBF formed from the local surface element size, the influence parameter, and the background mesh size. Our application utilizes non-uniform rational basis spline (NURBS) curves and surfaces for primitive shape definition. Target element size and influence parameters are assigned at parametric locations within the NURBS definition. A discrete tessellation of the NURBS shape is then created with each point generating an RBF. Finally, the desired element size at a discrete position is calculated from a blend of the effective RBFs in the region. Results from a variety of weighting schemes will be presented along with efficiency gains introduced through the use of oct-tree sorting of the RBFs.

MeshTrends is a symposium held annually in conjunction with the U.S. National Congress on Computational Mechanics. This year’s event is being held in beautiful San Diego, California.

If you’ll be at MeshTrends, don’t hesitate to meet Nick and ask him questions about this research.

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Impressions of the 10th OpenFOAM Workshop

As a new OpenFOAM user I had the opportunity to attend the 10th OpenFOAM Workshop held at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Pointwise participated in the workshop in a variety of ways: we sponsored it, we worked the booth, and we presented our own work. In short, it was a great week!

The Workshop Venue and Program

The nice weather (coming from Texas that is very important!) and the university’s beautiful campus characterized by open spaces and a unique combination of classical and modern architecture made this the perfect location for the workshop. On top of the nice setting, a relaxed atmosphere and the collaborative spirit among all the participants greatly facilitated (and I would dare say encouraged) the exchange of ideas, experiences, and current struggles with some of the most renowned names in the OpenFOAM community.

In my opinion, the workshop was well structured and nicely organized (kudos to Dr. Kevin Maki and the organizing committee!). It featured a nice balance between keynotes, papers, and training sessions that pretty much guaranteed that everyone in attendance would come out of the workshop with a good understanding of the current state-of-the-art in OpenFOAM and the challenges being faced by this community moving forward.

Technical Presentations and Training

On the first day of the workshop I attended the Pre-Processing/ Post-Processing/ Meshing session. The first presentation was entitled Assessment of Automatic Mesh Generation Algorithm Using snappyHexMesh 2.3. The presenter did a very good job discussing the performance of the different Cartesian dominated mesh generation algorithms in snappyHexMesh using different geometries focused on internal turbulent flow applied to hydraulic machinery. This presentation was particularly interesting to me because it was my first encounter with snappyHexMesh.

Another truly interesting presentation in the same session was the one entitled Evolving HELYX-OS, the Open-Source Graphical User Interface for OpenFOAM. As you can imagine, the idea of a graphical interface for OpenFOAM sounds very appealing to a new OpenFOAM user like myself! Here the presenter showed the main features available in the new HELYX-OS v2 software. He focused on the new interface for the creation of block meshes and the visualization of feature lines to allow for a better detection of edges during the mesh generation process. Overall, the presentation was a nice overview of HELYX-OS.

Just in case the seemingly unending stream of very good and useful presentations was not enough, the workshop also offered twelve training sessions that spanned a variety of relevant topics to the OpenFOAM community. The best part of this was that the training sessions were conveniently divided into three different levels: basic, intermediate, and advanced. Each track ensured that attendees would learn something useful regardless of their level of expertise in a certain area of interest.

I had the opportunity to attend two training sessions: Introduction to Paraview (beginner level) and A Concise Introduction to snappyHexmesh Theory and Application (intermediate level). I enjoyed both of them! They gave me a greater insight into the inner workings of these two pieces of software that are used by several of our customers. As a member of the Support Team, having knowledge of the different tools being used by our customers helps me to better understand their grid generation needs and this, in turn, allows me to provide them with a high level of technical support.

Meshing Considerations for Automotive Design Optimization

On Wednesday afternoon Travis Carrigan, a Senior Engineer in our Sales & Marketing Team, joined Optimal Solutions’ Mark Landon to discuss our joint automotive design optimization work. Our paper titled Meshing Considerations for Automotive Design Optimization described a collection of strategies and best practices for cleaning and meshing complex analytic CAD models encountered in the automotive industry. The high quality grids generated by our viscous unstructured meshing tool, T-Rex, are a prerequisite for shape deformation as they eliminate the need for remeshing from the typical design optimization loop.

High quality meshing coupled with robust shape deformation techniques enable large space design exploration for optimization without the need for remeshing.

High quality meshing coupled with robust shape deformation techniques enable large space design exploration for optimization without the need for remeshing.

Hybrid volume mesh for the DrivAer geometry colored by element volume.

Hybrid volume mesh for the DrivAer geometry colored by element volume.

A close up of the side mirror shows in detail the anisotropic layers of combined prisms generated by our T-Rex algorithm.

A close up of the side mirror shows in detail the anisotropic layers of combined prisms generated by our T-Rex algorithm.

The Henry Ford Museum

To wrap up the content-packed Wednesday, we had the chance to relax and enjoy a nice reception at the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan. The museum houses a large collection of rare exhibits including John F. Kennedy’s presidential limousine, Abraham Lincoln’s chair from Ford’s Theater, and the Rosa Parks bus among many others. If you have never been there (or if you have been there and would like to check out the new attractions), it is highly recommended!

Two of the main attractions that we got to enjoy at the Henry Ford Museum: the Rosa Parks bus and Lincoln’s chair from Ford’s Theater.

Two of the main attractions that we got to enjoy at the Henry Ford Museum: the Rosa Parks bus and Lincoln’s chair from Ford’s Theater.

Birds of a Feather Sessions

On the last day of the workshop several Birds of a Feather sessions were held where Grid Generation happened to be the most voted for topic. The meshing discussion group had about 35 people and we had the chance to discuss several relevant topics:

  • Grid Generation Software: To our surprise there were 21 different grid generation packages currently being used by the people in our group. Furthermore, everybody was using at least two different tools to generate the grids that they need.
  • Grid Quality: Grid quality and effect on solution accuracy was a reoccurring theme in our discussion. Metrics such as element volume, orthogonality, skewness, and volume ratio were mentioned as contributors to poor solution accuracy. That being said, grid quality goes beyond geometry and is also driven by the specifics of the simulation being performed. While there was an idea of coming up with a single grid quality metric for OpenFOAM, we elected to ask the community to describe the metrics that affect their solutions for a variety of problem types.
  • Geometry: Most of the members of our discussion group pointed out that they primarily use discrete geometry in the STL format and that one of the biggest bottlenecks in their workflow is cleaning bad CAD data. We discussed the idea of using analytic geometry for quality and workflow improvements.
  • Automated vs. Automatic: We took a vote and it was clear that engineers need control over their grids and that several tools seem to be taking that control away from the user in favor of automatic meshing.
  • Solution Adaptive Meshing and Parallelization: All the members in our discussion group agreed that these two topics are very important to them. Particularly, they all want the ability to parallelize the grid generation process in order to generate bigger grids in a shorter period of time.

Conclusions

Overall it was a great workshop and I would recommend everyone interested in learning more about OpenFOAM to attend in the future. Next year the workshop will be held in Portugal. We are very thankful to the organizers for setting up the perfect venue that allowed us to meet with old friends and make new ones while enjoying very relevant presentations and training sessions. We certainly hope everyone enjoyed the workshop as much as we did.

If you’d like to learn more about the 10th OpenFOAM Workshop and view the presentations, please visit www.ofw10.org.

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I’m Madison Goodwin and This Is How I Mesh

Madison Goodwin, Business & Administrative Services Intern.

Madison Goodwin, Business & Administrative Services Intern.

I’m an intern at Pointwise, Inc., the first Administrative intern ever hired. It’s my job to digitize important documents as part of the Disaster Recovery project, although some would argue I’m just here for the food.

I am a college student from Utah, currently in transition from BYU-Idaho to the BYU in Provo. My major is in English with an emphasis in creative writing. So what am I doing at Pointwise? That’s easy—paying for college. I was job hunting a few months ago when I heard about this position. I leapt at the opportunity to live in Texas for a few months, and I am so glad I did, because working here has been an amazing opportunity.

  • Location: Fort Worth, TX
  • Current position: Business & Administrative Services Intern
  • Current computer: Dell Precision M4400 laptop
  • One word that best describes how you work: Thoroughly

What software or tools do you use every day?

My best friend is the Canon Copier/Printer iRC3480 named “Happy.” It scans all of my documents and sends them directly to my email, which I access using Outlook. I also use an instant messaging program called Spark to interact with my co-workers (let’s be real—it’s basically the tool used to summon me to their bidding). My favorite tool perhaps is the giant Fellowes 99ci Shredder that I get to use on occasion to clear out piles upon piles of old papers.

What does your workspace look like?

Madison's current workspace.

Madison’s current workspace.

I am in a corner with the conference room to my right and a nice wall-sized window at my back. I have two desks situated in an L-shape to maximize my space for the many papers I deal with and a small filing drawer for storage. The location is also ideal for my job—about five paces away from “Happy.”

What are you currently working on?

My job right now (and always) is to digitize all important Pointwise paperwork. This is part of the Emergency Response Plan. Scanning all irreplaceable documents to a secure location will allow Pointwise to have a speedy recovery in the event of a disaster. My part in all of this is to scan the documents and save them in electronic files.

What would you say is your specialty at Pointwise?

My specialty is to have no specialty. I am the one who fills in all of the loose gaps and holes to keep things running smoothly. I’ve done everything from sending out mail to answering phone calls, from archiving old files to writing office procedures, and everything in-between.

Any tips, tricks, or advice for our users?

The best tip I can offer you is that no matter how boring and insignificant your job may seem, with the right attitude you can have a fantastic work experience. Take me for example: I scan papers—all day, every day—yet I thoroughly enjoy my work experience. It is possible.

What project are you most proud of and why?

I am the most proud of my work with archiving old vendor files. Before I got my hands on this project, we had three filing cabinets that were filled with papers, some of them as old as I am. I was given the chance to archive all documents up to the year 2014. After packing those ancient documents into storage, all the files that were left could easily fit into one cabinet.

Have you recently read any books or articles we should know about?

Nothing really engineering-related, but for those looking to improve the quality of their life (really, who isn’t?) I would highly recommend reading The Secret by Rhonda Byrne. As cliché as it sounds, this self-empowering book has truly changed my life. This book definitely requires an open mind, but it’s a short read that will keep you thinking long after the last page has been turned.

Do you plan on attending any conferences or workshops this year?

Not any time in the near future. However, I did have the chance to go to the AIAA Aviation Conference where I was able to browse around the different displays. There were some pretty fascinating companies and products that were being showcased, including some cool-looking aircraft and amazing high-speed cameras.

What do you do when you’re not surrounded by engineers making meshes?

I absolutely adore music, so if I’m not singing around the house or playing the piano, I’m probably blaring Pandora on my phone. I have also recently started doing CrossFit, and I have fallen in love with it. Aside from that, I enjoy long walks in the park, reading, eating, sleeping, or Pinterest-ing (yes, that is now a verb in my book). Someday I will get around to actually doing all the DIY crafts I’ve Pinned.

What is some of the best advice you’ve received?

Enjoy the moment now, because that’s really all you’ve got. If you look at everything as a means to an end, you’ll never be satisfied. Instead of working out to get fit, enjoy the act of working out. Rather than working to get paid, enjoy your job. That is how I’ve learned to live life and not just have a life.

If you had to pick a place to have dinner, where would you go?

This is the worst question—isn’t food just good in general? If I really had to choose, it would be Winger’s Roadhouse Grill in Utah. It was the restaurant of choice whenever I would go out with my girlfriends. With the popcorn appetizer, steak-fries, famous Sticky Chicken Fingers, and a slice of mint and chocolate Asphalt Pie, Winger’s just can’t go wrong. I’ve definitely missed it while living here in Texas.

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This Week in CFD

CFD News

We at Pointwise love working with students and Stanford's Solar Car is one great example of why. Image from The Stanford Daily. Click image for article.

We at Pointwise love working with students and Stanford’s Solar Car is one great example of why. Image from The Stanford Daily. Click image for article.

  • Altair challenges you to begin using CFD in the cloud. Their HPC Cloud Challenge will award selected applicants with software, support, and access to their HyperWorks Unlimited Virtual Appliance. See the details here.
  • The CD-adapco Daily is now being published on paper.li. [Huzzah! More to read!]
  • Symscape’s newsletter for July 2015 has been published.
  • Not CFD but still should be interesting to this audience: he new blog Maker Engineer.
  • Read Intelligent Light‘s summary of AIAA Aviation 2015 and watch the video of their award-winning animation.

Applications

Surface pressure on a bluefin tuna computed using SC/Tetra. Analysis by Kinki University. Image from Software Cradle. See link below.

Surface pressure on a bluefin tuna computed using SC/Tetra. Analysis by Kinki University. Image from Software Cradle. See link below.

Software

  • Friendship Systems released CAESES 4.0 (formerly Friendship Framework) for modeling and optimization. In addition to the rebranding, the software has an updated GUI and an accompanying free version, CAESES Free.
  • Engys released HELYX-OS v2.3.0, the open source GUI for OpenFOAM.
  • 3MF is a proposed, next-generation file format for 3D printing. But because the de facto standard STL file is also widely used as a geometry definition we need to consider how 3MF will impact us.

Events

When you have 50 minutes to spare, spend it with this video on The Finer Points of Meshing in Autodesk Simulation CFD. Click image for video.

When you have 50 minutes to spare, spend it with this video on The Finer Points of Meshing in Autodesk Simulation CFD. Click image for video.

Never Forget: Paint is a Fluid Too

Sometimes it’s hard to remember that not all abstract painting utilizes grids, geometry, faceting, reticulation and other mesh-like features.

Fluid dynamicists should never forget that painters have extensive, applied expertise with fluids – specifically paint. They often mix their own paints using esoteric materials (Rothko used eggs) to obtain the properties they need to express their ideas. You may recall an article cited here a few years ago about Jackson Pollock’s exploitation of the fluid properties of paint. Take for instance painter David Alfaro Siqueiros and his work Collective Suicide.

David Alfaro Siqueiros, Collective Suicide, 1936. Click image for source.

David Alfaro Siqueiros, Collective Suicide, 1936. Click image for source.

We read in a research paper by Zetina et al (A Hydrodynamic Instability Is Used to Create Aesthetically Appealing Patterns in Painting) that Siqueiros’ technique of pouring different paints on a horizontal canvas allowed the artist to achieve unique patterns because of the paints’ differing densities and the resulting Rayleigh-Taylor instability.

Consider the image below which is a close-up of a portion of Collective Suicide from the bottom, just to the right of center.

Closeup of Siqueiros' Collective Suicide showing the mixing of black and white paints. Image from Zetina's article cited and linked above.

Closeup of Siqueiros’ Collective Suicide showing the mixing of black and white paints. Image from Zetina’s article cited and linked above.

The researchers believe that this technical insight into the technique will help future painters but will also be of great assistance to art conservationists.

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This Week in CFD

Visualization

  • FieldView 15.1 is now available and includes surface flow lines and animated particle paths.
  • EnSight 10.1.5.a is now available and includes threaded pathlines.
  • A special thanks to our friends at Mentor Graphics for remembering their American cousins on July 4th with a Boston Tea Party themed simulation that resulted in the beautiful image shown below.
Streamlines in a teapot done with a line integral convolution method. Image from Mentor Graphics. See link above.

Streamlines in a teapot done with a line integral convolution method. Image from Mentor Graphics. See link above.

Events

  • The 5th Metacomp Symposium has been scheduled for 15-17 September 2015 in Pasadena. Abstracts for presentations are due 04 August.
  • On a related note, Metacomp’s CFD++ is one of the solvers featured in Desktop Engineering’s article on Expanding the Search for CFD Solutions.
  • The proceedings of the 6th Beta CAE International Conference are available online for you to download.
  • On a related note, Beta CAE released ANSA v15.3.1.
Screen capture from a CD-adapco simulation of a Hawker Hurricane water landing.  [Feeds my love of WWII-era aircraft.] Click image for video.

Screen capture from a CD-adapco simulation of a Hawker Hurricane water landing. [Feeds my love of WWII-era aircraft.] Click image for video.

Reading

  • ANSYS’ blog wants us to “think big” about the future of simulation. [I had a boss 30 years ago whose vision for CFD was that you should be able to sit down at a workstation and simply fly the plane via real-time simulation. Nice, but not actionable. Like having a vision for medicine which is “prevent all diseases.”]
  • GrabCAD’s blog says now is the time for all CAD to be “free.”
    • “Money has to be made somewhere, and certainly should be when value is provided.”
    • “When we say free CAD, we mean free to use indefinitely, but under restrictions.”
    • “…why could customers keep paying? You make it about data, support, and deployment flexibility…”

Miscellaneous

Not CFD, but a cool simulation of solar plasma nonetheless. Video by NCSA. Click image for video.

Not CFD, but a cool simulation of solar plasma nonetheless. Video by NCSA. Click image for video.

  • SimScale is looking for the next #F1SimStar, i.e. the person who can make the most impressive visualization of airflow around a Formula-1 car. Deadline is “12.07.2015.” [As an American, I have no idea whether that’s December 7th or July 12th.] To support this contest they have posted three videos and other resources about simulations.
  • TechClarity wants you to participate in their survey if you’ve recently changed or are planning to change CAD tools. You might win a $20 Amazon gift card.
  • IBM’s 7 nanometer computer chip promises 4x the power of current designs. [Maybe Moore’s Law isn’t dead after all.]
  • Is the STL file format on it’s way out? DEVELOP3D shares news about the 3MF Consortium‘s efforts to promote a modern file format for 3D printing and other apps.
  • Did you know there is a mesh generation forum on ResearchGate?

Sometimes a Banana is Just a Banana – And Other Times It’s a Mesh

Artist Dan Cretu has embarked on a series of wood-carvings of bananas that feature a mesh motif. There’s a joke in here somewhere about “banana included for scale” but I’ll leave that to you. [Joke from SNL included intentionally.] You can find more of Cretu’s banana sculptures here.

Correction: The artist informs me that the sculptures are not wood and that they are all rotten now.

Dan Cretu, Banana, 2015. Image from That's Nerdalicious. See link above.

Dan Cretu, Bananametric, 2015. Image from That’s Nerdalicious. See link above.

Bonus: From Monet to Riley, the role of geometry in abstract painting. As Mondrian said, he didn’t want to be limited to making mere imitations of the external world.

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